Urban Agriculture in Portugal: ahead or behind?

Coming from Portugal, I see urban agriculture as a very interesting process.

Porto, where I come from, has a big metropolitan area, with about 1 million of inhabitants. With most of my friends having families from the countryside of Portugal, I was the “unfortunate” one, with my four grandparents living  in the same neighbourhood in Gaia (the city on the other side of the river from Porto, which hosts the cellars where the Porto wine rests). This meant that every summer and holiday season my friends would take off to meet their relatives in villages somewhere in the idyllic Portuguese countryside (idyllic to me, at least), and I had to stay in Gaia.

But living in the city does not mean that I did not have any contact with the rural world. I used to help my grandmother to feed the chickens in her backyard. I remember more often, when she took me to look at the chickens, as a distraction manoeuvre to manage to feed me. (I was not so much into food when I was a child). Even now, she still grows some vegetables: cabbages, tomatoes, beans.

The knowledge that was passed on to her by her mother, and probably by most parents of the early 20th century, has in many cases, not passed on to the newer generations. The great urbanization seen in the last century is definitely partly “to blame”, alongside the lower status that is associated with “working the land”.

However, in Porto and its surroundings  the “rural world” is still very mixed with the urban landscape. Although allotment gardens become more popular and even trendy, most of the agriculture in this region is carried out by people who have always done it like that: using “efficiently” the land they own, as their parents did.

As I wrote here for EUKN, you can still easily find espigueiros popping out of the urban-rural landscape. Espigueiros are an old type of granary built to keep rodents (mice, rats..) away from cereals.

This close contact between the rural and the urban domains is, in my opinion, a characteristic of Portugal, unusual in most of Western Europe.  It is, on one hand, a sign of our “lag” in economic development. On the other hand, it is an asset that could allow us to leapfrog into a future of lively and local-boosted food economies.

I leave you with some pictures of the rural in the city.

Espigueiros, by Paulo Gonçalves. Found in http://viajaredescobrir.blogspot.nl/2011/12/portugal-arcozelo.html
Espigueiros, by Paulo Gonçalves.  Found here.

You can spot couves everywhere. Can you see the small ones?

small cabbages can be seen!
Garden by the street, small cabbages can be seen!

Fruit trees are also commonly found, peeking from the other side of the walls.

Orange tree waving hello!
Orange tree waving hello!

Another improvised vegetable garden, with a gardener in action, watering the field!

Can you spot the gardener?
Can you spot the gardener?

This last picture was taken 5 minutes walking from my home.  The buildings in the distance are part of Vila D’Este, one of the biggest residential developments in Portugal, accommodating 17,000 inhabitants.

Another vegetable garden, looking on Vila D'Este, a big residential development.
Another vegetable garden, looking on Vila D’Este, a big residential development.

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